Chanterelles and Haggis

When I think back fondly of summer mornings in rural Scotland, one meal that comes back to me again and again is Chanterelles, served with haggis and toast. This is where I first tried this incredible mushroom, and where I enjoy them the most. They usually appear on the kitchen table after a couple of early risers arrive back from their stalk. Whether they were successful in getting a deer or not, the sight of these beautiful bright orange mushrooms is the real prize to me. As the cold days have well and truly arrived, this recipe will certainly warm you up after a long day out hunting. Chanterelles are in season until the end of November, so make sure you get picking as soon as possible.


Chanterelles have a very distinctive flavour that is difficult to compare to anything else. Because of this, you want to accentuate the taste, not mask it.


First, you need to wash your mushrooms well. I find that placing them in a colander with a gently running tap over is the best way to do this, ensuring that they are thoroughly clean. Next up, I gently melt down some butter in a large pan, not too hot, and put the mushrooms in. Crush some garlic and put that in too, and add a good splash of white wine. Once they are cooking nicely, I add some cream and heat that through, marrying it with the wine. Season with salt and pepper, and serve. 


Haggis is a great accompaniment to this breakfast, and as a Scottish staple it really reminds me of long days spent amongst the heather. A good size haggis takes about an hour to cook so remember this when you're cooking your mushrooms. Alternatively, keep it veggie and just go for some buttery toast to savour the flavour of the chanterelles as much as possible. 


Chanterelles are also delicious in omelettes if you want to stay on the breakfast theme, or if you're looking for a substantial dinner they work wonders with tagliatelle or in a risotto. For each of these, you're looking at a very similar recipe to our breakfast one! Just add in some finely diced white onion and finish with a hefty helping of parmesan.

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